What is Clinical Nutrition?

Clinical nutrition is the study of the relationship between food and a healthy body. More specifically, it is the science of nutrients and how they are digested, absorbed, transported, metabolized, stored, and eliminated by the body. Besides studying how food works in the body, nutritionists are interested in how the environment affects the quality and safety of foods, and what influence these factors have on health and disease.

What is clinical nutrition good for?

Studies show that eating habits play a major role in the development of certain chronic diseases, including heart disease, obesity, cancer, and diabetes. Making changes to your diet can help prevent and treat these conditions. For example, lowering certain fats and cholesterol and adding whole grains to your diet can help prevent atherosclerosis (plaque build up in the arteries), which can lead to heart disease or stroke. Eating fewer calories will help you lose weight. Cutting down on simple sugars (glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose) can help prevent diabetes, and diets high in fiber (especially soluble fiber) can help control diabetes.

Scientists have found many other connections between diet and disease. Read more.
 
What is a healthful diet?

Our food needs are influenced by many factors, including age, gender, body size, pregnancy, and health. A clinical nutritionist can help you determine which type of diet is best for you. No matter what, you can improve your diet by adding more fruits and vegetables and cutting back on overly processed foods and sugar.

 
What happens during a visit to a clinical nutritionist?

First, the clinical nutritionist will ask you questions about your medical history, family history, and personal lifestyle. The medical history might include questions about your diet, digestion, history of weight loss or gain, sleep and exercise patterns, and relaxation habits. During the second part of the visit, the nutritionist will suggest ways that you can fill the gaps and reduce the nutritional "overloads" in your diet. For example, your nutritionist may suggest that you eat your meals at different times or cut down on the amount of carbohydrates that you eat. The nutritionist will also offer advice on specific nutritional supplements if necessary. The nutritionist will then schedule follow up visits to monitor your health.

Our clinical nutrition practitioner is well-known for treating
○ Kids from infants to teenagers
○ Adults with digestive problems
○ Athletes
○ Weight loss


Our Therapists

Kenneth Chu